Israel's Deportation of "South Sudanese" Worrying

By Sarnata Reynolds
Having just returned from the new nation of South Sudan where I assessed the risk of statelessness, I am very worried about Israel's decision to arrest, jail, and deport all 1500 of that country’s "South Sudanese."

A Frustrated Council Puts Pressure on Sudans

By Michelle Brown

The UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution on Wednesday demanding that Sudan and South Sudan immediately stop fighting and conclude negotiations within three months on the issues of citizenship, oil revenue sharing, borders, and the status of Abyei. 

Sudan Clashes Have Huge Costs Beyond Battlefield

By Sarnata Reynolds

The recent conflict between Sudan and South Sudan has seen civilians in border areas subjected to brutal attacks by both sides. However, as I found while in South Sudan last week, the impact of this conflict goes far beyond the disputed areas of Heglig or Abyei, threatening many more lives.

Prior to the most recent round of fighting, millions of Sudanese on both sides of the border were already displaced and vulnerable - from the restive Sudanese states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan, to South Sudanese villages emptied by tribal conflicts.

Bureaucratic Mess in Juba Puts Millions on Path to Statelessness

By Sarnata Reynolds

The ongoing conflict between the Sudans affects daily life for everyone here, whether through fuel shortages or price inflation. But beyond the conflict zone itself, few have been more affected than the hundreds of thousands of southern Sudanese returning from the north.

Khartoum's Deadly Game

By Peter Orr

This blog post originally appeared at ThinkProgress Security as a guest post.

Amazingly, a Dysfunctional Congress Delivers

By Marc Hanson

This week, the Washington Post published a poll showing that the U.S. Congress has set a new record for disapproval. A whopping 84 percent of Americans do not approve of the way Congress is doing its job. Media coverage of the House and Senate highlights the brinksmanship and polarized politicking that seems to surround every piece of legislation – and now, even routine nominations and confirmations.

Gaining a Nation, Losing a Nationality

By Sarnata Reynolds

Just as the Republic of South Sudan (RoSS) officially gained nationhood six months ago, hundreds of thousands of southern Sudanese were losing their nationality. 

While independence was being celebrated in Juba, the government in Khartoum was busy declaring that anyone with family ties to the new country would no longer be Sudanese. They would be stripped of the only nationality they had ever held.

Stemming Ethnic Violence in South Sudan

By Peter Orr

This blog post originally appeared at UN Dispatch as a special guest post.

Building on the Success of 2011

By Michael Boyce

Happy New Year, from all of us at Refugees International! Before we start tackling the challenges of 2012 – and there will be many – we bring you a brief wrap-up of all things RI from the year gone by.

First, "RI in 2011: By the Numbers":

16 Days: To End Violence Against Women, Enlist the Men

By Michel Gabaudan

For the last two weeks, my colleagues have reflected on global efforts to combat violence against women and girls, as part of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence. Today, I want to examine a vital and practical solution to the problem of gender violence: the engagement of men and boys. 

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