In Burma, Rohingya Face a New Threat: Flooding

By Refugees International

By Isabel Rutherfurd, Refugees International Intern

Speaking to Burmese in Yangon last December, I heard a lot of cautious optimism and relief about the reforms inspired by the government’s transition to democracy.

Thein Sein Should Send Suu Kyi to Rakhine

By Melanie Teff

This article originally appeared in The Bangkok Post.

Aung San Suu Kyi has been more successful in mobilising Myanmar's people for change than any figure in recent history. Through her perseverance, she convinced her compatriots that with time, effort and unity of purpose, reform really was possible. The odds were long, but eventually she won and was proved right.

Stateless in America: Part I

By Avy Mallik

Exactly one year ago, a historic summit took place in Geneva on the rights of refugees and stateless people. On December 9, 2011, the United States and 154 other nations met to discuss the importance of the 1951 Refugee Convention and the 1954 and 1961 Statelessness Conventions. But what made the conference historic was not the debate, but the pledges.

S. Sudan Takes Vital Step to Prevent Statelessness

By Sarnata Reynolds
South Sudan opened its second Nationality Directorate on November 28, and the government expects that offices will be opened in all 10 South Sudanese states by the new year. This is a tremendous step for the world's newest country and should greatly decrease the risk of statelessness.

Burma Raises Prospect of Rohingya Citizenship

By Sarnata Reynolds
In an interview with The Hindu newspaper this week, Burmese Minister of Information U Ang Kyi said that his government is attempting to address the ongoing violence in Rakhine State through the development of a "win-win solution for all stakeholders." Acknowledging that treating the stateless Rohingya as trespassers was an underlying problem that needed to be addressed, he said the government was considering a process whereby “third-generation” R

Burma's Rohingya: Beyond the Communal Violence

By Avy Mallik

On Tuesday, October 9th, the Open Society Foundations and Refugees International co-hosted an event on the ongoing inter-communal violence in Rakhine State, Burma, which has displaced thousands of stateless Rohingya. The event brought together representatives of the U.S. government, civil society, and the media to review recent developments in Burma and Bangladesh.

We Can Do More. We Must Do More.

By Caelin Briggs

I am excited to be joining RI as the new advocate for DRC and the Sudans. With the presidential election now approaching, and renewed Congressional interest in the conflicts of Sub-Saharan Africa, it is an exhilarating time to be joining the organization. 

RI, HRW, Amnesty Urge Kuwait's Emir to End Bidoon Abuses

By Michael Boyce

Today, RI, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International submitted a joint letter to the Emir of Kuwait demanding an end to abuses of the stateless bidoon and the acknowledgement of their citizenship rights. The full letter is as follows:

September 27, 2012

HH Sheikh Sabah IV Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah
Al Diwan Al Amiri
Seif Palace – Building 100
State of Kuwait

Your Highness,

Aung San Suu Kyi and the Road Ahead for Burma

By Michel Gabaudan

The political thaw in Burma has advanced so quickly that it is hard to believe Aung San Suu Kyi was here in Washington yesterday, giving her first public speech at the outset of an historic trip to the U.S.

Yet as Suu Kyi was quick to point out in her remarks (which you can view in the video below), the country’s progress to date is fragile and easily reversible. Indeed, she reminded the audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace that she remains but the leader of a small opposition group in Parliament, not the head of government.

Bangladesh Compounds Misery for Rohingya Community

By Melanie Teff

It’s hard to imagine that life could get much worse for the Rohingya, a stateless Burmese Muslim minority group. But yesterday’s news that Bangladesh has ordered non-governmental organizations to stop providing Rohingya refugees with (already minimal) services will surely increase their suffering.

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